Gloverall

This Winter, the cold arrived more bitterly than usual, and I decided that I would like to make use of a duffle coat to fight it off. I have always found there to be something quite traditional about a duffle coat, without being too formal. I decided to look into the history of the coat a little more and discovered that (funnily enough) they originate from the Beligian town of Duffel. A duffel coat literally meant a fairly shapeless outer garment with a densely woven cloth for ultimate warmth. The slightly differently spelled Duffle coats became part of British tradition around 1890 when a man named John Partridge decided to make outerwear using duffel fabrics.

During World War I, the British Navy adopted the garment, and it became standard issue in the camel colourway still seen today. The coats were perfect for the navy servicemen as the fabric helped protect against the harsh sea conditions, the famous toggle fastneings could be undone whilst wearing thick gloves, and the slightly oversize nature of the fit allowed them to be worn over their service outfits. Gloverall established themselves in 1954 after purchasing a surplus supply of military stock and producing theuir own ranges based around it. The designs sold today barely differ from the original garments purchased.

The name Gloverall comes from the original creators of the brand, Harold & Freda Morris, who previously specialised in cottons, selling gloves and overalls.

Best of all, Gloverall is still made in England (London to be exact). I chose the camel coloured version to be true to the heritage.

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One Response to “Gloverall”

  1. Sophie Olivia Says:

    “The name Gloverall comes from the original creators of the brand, Harold & Freda Morris, who previously specialised in cottons, selling gloves and overalls.”

    Love this a lot x

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